• Appraisals

    We are giving our appraisal process a significant overhaul to make it more concise, to boost employee engagement and ensure it is something which adds genuine value to the business. As a start, we took a step back and asked ourselves "what is the purpose of the appraisal?" Once we had shaped this into a well-defined purpose statement we were able to develop some good ideas how to improve the approach to appraisals, which I am sure will be a big improvement.

    Historically, we have used a very boring-looking appraisal document which has tables to enter text into. It sets a tone for the whole process, which suggests it will be boring and something to endure rather than enjoy!

    Has anyone got examples of exciting-looking appraisal documents which help engage staff and bring a bit of fun into the process as well?
  • We are giving our appraisal process a significant overhaul to make it more concise, to boost employee engagement and ensure it is something which adds genuine value to the business. As a start, we took a step back and asked ourselves "what is the purpose of the appraisal?" Once we had shaped this into a well-defined purpose statement we were able to develop some good ideas how to improve the approach to appraisals, which I am sure will be a big improvement.

    Historically, we have used a very boring-looking appraisal document which has tables to enter text into. It sets a tone for the whole process, which suggests it will be boring and something to endure rather than enjoy!

    Has anyone got examples of exciting-looking appraisal documents which help engage staff and bring a bit of fun into the process as well?


  • Hi @Dan Aldridge

    A great question - thank you for posting on the Network. We will highlight your question in our newsletter which goes out tomorrow and I encourage other members to share examples of exciting-looking appraisal documents with you.

    Best regards,

    Daniel.
    Network Community Manager
    Need help? Ask me your questions about the Network here

    You can now download the EEF Network on the Apple Store or Google Play see here
  • Hi @Dan Aldridge

    A great question - thank you for posting on the Network. We will highlight your question in our newsletter which goes out tomorrow and I encourage other members to share examples of exciting-looking appraisal documents with you.

    Best regards,

    Daniel.
    Network Community Manager
    Need help? Ask me your questions about the Network here

    You can now download the EEF Network on the Apple Store or Google Play see here


  • Hi @Dan Aldridge,

    Interesting question and i referred to one of my HR colleagues about his methods:

    - the process shouldn't be focused on a document at all but rather practical, relevant and helpful conversations, namely

    1) Separating the ‘objective setting and review’ element from the ‘career development’ part, and addressing them on different occasions, so that they each get their own focus. Trying to do it all together means people have lost the will to live by the time they get to the conversation about their development.

    2) Ditch ‘objectives’ (that are frequently made up to just to fill in the form and then ignored) and replace them with real life KPIs that are descriptions of what happens when the job is being done really well. Give your staff some help but get them engaged in determining what they should be. It’s a wonderful way of talking about what the most important priorities are for them to be working on….. Getting them involved in the process also changes their mind-set towards the appraisal process, if they have helped to invent it!

    3) With this in place, an ‘appraisal’ becomes a regular chat (say quarterly) between manager and team member about how they are doing against their KPIs and helping them to overcome challenges and be even more successful. Much less prep time, much easier conversation to have, much more relevant.

    4) Then, separately, talk to people about their career development and training. Your enthusiastic, career oriented individuals will want to do this often but your more comfortable employees less so. You can spend that extra time with people who will respond to it and give you a better return.

    So there is no document per se - regular bitsized chunks, continuous monitoring and improvement, rather than geared up for a annual form completing exercise, so in a nutshell i haven't got anything to pass on, but hopefully you see where we're coming from with the aim of getting the most of it from both sides when tiem is at a premium?

    thanks

    Phil
  • Hi @Dan Aldridge,

    Interesting question and i referred to one of my HR colleagues about his methods:

    - the process shouldn't be focused on a document at all but rather practical, relevant and helpful conversations, namely

    1) Separating the ‘objective setting and review’ element from the ‘career development’ part, and addressing them on different occasions, so that they each get their own focus. Trying to do it all together means people have lost the will to live by the time they get to the conversation about their development.

    2) Ditch ‘objectives’ (that are frequently made up to just to fill in the form and then ignored) and replace them with real life KPIs that are descriptions of what happens when the job is being done really well. Give your staff some help but get them engaged in determining what they should be. It’s a wonderful way of talking about what the most important priorities are for them to be working on….. Getting them involved in the process also changes their mind-set towards the appraisal process, if they have helped to invent it!

    3) With this in place, an ‘appraisal’ becomes a regular chat (say quarterly) between manager and team member about how they are doing against their KPIs and helping them to overcome challenges and be even more successful. Much less prep time, much easier conversation to have, much more relevant.

    4) Then, separately, talk to people about their career development and training. Your enthusiastic, career oriented individuals will want to do this often but your more comfortable employees less so. You can spend that extra time with people who will respond to it and give you a better return.

    So there is no document per se - regular bitsized chunks, continuous monitoring and improvement, rather than geared up for a annual form completing exercise, so in a nutshell i haven't got anything to pass on, but hopefully you see where we're coming from with the aim of getting the most of it from both sides when tiem is at a premium?

    thanks

    Phil


  • Hi @Dan Aldridge

    we use the ACAS template but adapt it - we also incorporate into our values and a couple of the GALLUP questions as well to make sure they are getting recognition and giving recongnition.
    Last edited by Daniel Kirmatzis; 25-10-2018 at 02:41 PM.
  • Hi @Dan Aldridge

    we use the ACAS template but adapt it - we also incorporate into our values and a couple of the GALLUP questions as well to make sure they are getting recognition and giving recongnition.


  • Hi @Dan Aldridge

    The most important factors are the conversation and the outcomes from it. Our managers didn't want to carry out appraisals as it involved a four page form and was a tick box exercise so they stopped doing them.
    Recently employees have starting asking for appraisals so I've devised a one sided form with six questions on it but have issued it with guidelines confirming the form isn't the focus, the conversation is. We're also running appraisal training next month to support this.
    The questions are:
    What has been most challenging for you during the last year?
    What do you feel you are best at/what are you enjoying?
    What motivates you at work?
    What are the biggest obstacles to getting your work done?
    What development activity would help you in your role (training/shadowing/networking)?
    What do you want to achieve over the next year and what do you need from me to achieve this?

    We're only just starting to use the new form so it will be interesting to see how it works and how we need to adapt it based on feedback.
    Last edited by Daniel Kirmatzis; 07-11-2018 at 03:22 PM. Reason: tagging
  • Hi @Dan Aldridge

    The most important factors are the conversation and the outcomes from it. Our managers didn't want to carry out appraisals as it involved a four page form and was a tick box exercise so they stopped doing them.
    Recently employees have starting asking for appraisals so I've devised a one sided form with six questions on it but have issued it with guidelines confirming the form isn't the focus, the conversation is. We're also running appraisal training next month to support this.
    The questions are:
    What has been most challenging for you during the last year?
    What do you feel you are best at/what are you enjoying?
    What motivates you at work?
    What are the biggest obstacles to getting your work done?
    What development activity would help you in your role (training/shadowing/networking)?
    What do you want to achieve over the next year and what do you need from me to achieve this?

    We're only just starting to use the new form so it will be interesting to see how it works and how we need to adapt it based on feedback.